Results from the ACTION survey about statins

Despite the proven benefits of taking statin medicine, at least 50% of people STOP taking their statin within 1 year of starting it.

To understand why, the national ACTION survey (Understanding Patient Adherence and Concerns with Statins, and Medication Discussions with Physicians) polled more than 5,000 US adults aged 45 or older with high cholesterol who have ever used a statin.

The survey found that there’s a clear need for more conversation and education about statins, including factors such as statin intensity, risk for potential drug interactions, and dietary restrictions.

Only 45% of current statin users say they communicate openly with their healthcare provider about challenges with their statin.

When prescribed a statin for the first time:

67%

say they weren’t told or can’t recall being told by their healthcare provider why a particular statin was prescribed.

90%

say they weren’t told or can’t recall being told how their prescribed statin was different from other statins.

79%

say they weren’t told or can’t recall being told by their healthcare provider that there are different types of statins available.

only 18%

say they were told that their prescribed statin could potentially interact with other medications and supplements.

People may be unaware of risks for drug-drug interactions when taking statins.

On average, people who currently use a statin are taking nearly 8 other medications and/or supplements, making the risk of drug-drug interactions with statins a serious possibility for many of them;

however, 76%

say they aren’t concerned about their statin interacting with other medications or supplements.

People need and want to make sure their statin is right for them.

Nearly 3 in 5 people (59%) say it’s extremely important to them that their healthcare provider takes an individualized approach to selecting the right statin for them.

56%

of people currently on a high-intensity statin* (like Lipitor® [atorvastatin] or Crestor® [rosuvastatin]) say they wish they could take a lower-intensity statin to manage their high cholesterol.

41%

say it’s extremely important that their healthcare provider considers their diet when recommending a statin.

If you’re taking a statin,

talk to your doctor to make sure the statin YOU
take is one that’s most appropriate for you.

*A high-intensity statin is one that aims to lower your LDL-C by 50% or more. For example, it includes 40-80 mg of atorvastatin or 20-40 mg of rosuvastatin daily.

Lipitor is a registered trademark of Pfizer, Inc.

Crestor is a registered trademark of the AstraZeneca group of companies.

Cohen JD, Brinton EA, Ito MK, Jacobson TA. Understanding statin use in America and gaps in patient education (USAGE): an internet-based survey of 10,138 current and former statin users. J Clin Lipidol. 2012;6:208-215.

Harris Poll conducted ACTION: The Statin Survey (Understanding Patient Adherence and Concerns with Statins, and Medication Discussions with Physicians) online on behalf of Kowa Pharmaceuticals America, Inc., within the United States from July 7- August 4, 2017, among 5,014 United States adults aged 45 or older who have been diagnosed with high cholesterol and have ever used a statin to treat high cholesterol. This online survey is not based on a probability sample, and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated. For complete survey methodology, including weighting variables, please contact Erin Bittner at W2O Group, 212-301-7226.